Press Announcements

Dr. Arnaud Martin have found a "painting gene" that influences the pattern and evolution of butterfly wings

Scientists Find ‘Painting Gene’ Influences Pattern, Evolution of Butterfly Wings

September 18, 2017

An international team of scientists including Arnaud Martin, assistant professor of biology, made a breakthrough in understanding how genetics and evolution work in concert to shape biodiversity by investigating the complex color patterns of butterfly wings. Martin used CRISPR gene-editing technology to study the role of the WntA gene in the formation of shapes and colors on butterfly wings—and how they diversify.

An excerpt from a leaf of the newly discovered manuscript of “Fath al-bari” at the Suleymaniye Library in Istanbul.

Early Drafts of a Classic Work of Islamic Thought Discovered

June 08, 2017

GW Assistant Professor of History Joel Blecher recently discovered the new manuscripts of two previously unknown versions of “Fath al-Bari,” a classic work that shaped the way Sunni Muslims understand Muhammad’s sayings and practices. Dr. Blecher visited the Suleymaniye Library in Istanbul in 2014 to examine a database of digitized manuscripts that can only be accessed in person, with the goal of learning more about how medieval Muslims interpreted Muhammad’s sayings and practices, called hadith. The manuscripts reveal how medieval Islamic scholars drafted and revised their understanding of Muhammad’s teachings to the early Muslim community.

Soyeon Park, GWTeach student who taught fourth graders at Maury Elementary in D.C. (Photo: Meghan Hollibaugh Baker)

GW Establishes New Program to Bring More STEM Teachers to High-Need Schools

May 15, 2017

Research Professor of Physics Larry Medsker today announces a new STEM initiative called GWNoyce. Named after the Robert Noyce Teacher Scholarship Program, this initiative offer science, technology, engineering and mathematics majors the opportunity to receive teacher training and scholarships for agreeing to teach in high-need school districts across the country after graduation from GW.

New Tool for Measuring Police and Law Enforcement Interactions Reflects Police-Based Discrimination Experiences of Black Men

May 03, 2017

Researchers led by Lisa Bowleg, Professor of Applied Social Psychology at the George Washington University, have developed a new tool to catalog police and law enforcement interactions with black men, the Police and Law Enforcement (PLE) Scale, with the hope of documenting people’s experiences and perceptions of police-based discrimination. The study found that police-based discrimination is associated with depression symptoms such as sadness, hopelessness and loss of interest and ambition. Because of this, the authors believe that police-based discrimination should be considered a public health threat. 

two bonobos

Study Finds Bonobos May Be Better Representation of the Last Common Ancestor with Humans than Common Chimpanzees

April 28, 2017

A new study by Bernard Wood, Professor of Human Origins at the GW Center for the Advanced Study of Human Paleobiology,  has provided firsthand evidence that bonobos may be more closely linked, anatomically, to human ancestors than common chimpanzees. Previous research suggested this theory at the molecular level, but this is the first study to compare in detail the anatomy of the three species.