Press Announcements

GW Establishes New Program to Bring More STEM Teachers to High-Need Schools

May 15, 2017

Research Professor of Physics Larry Medsker today announces a new STEM initiative called GWNoyce. Named after the Robert Noyce Teacher Scholarship Program, this initiative offer science, technology, engineering and mathematics majors the opportunity to receive teacher training and scholarships for agreeing to teach in high-need school districts across the country after graduation from GW.

two bonobos

Study Finds Bonobos May Be Better Representation of the Last Common Ancestor with Humans than Common Chimpanzees

April 28, 2017

A new study by Bernard Wood, Professor of Human Origins at the GW Center for the Advanced Study of Human Paleobiology,  has provided firsthand evidence that bonobos may be more closely linked, anatomically, to human ancestors than common chimpanzees. Previous research suggested this theory at the molecular level, but this is the first study to compare in detail the anatomy of the three species. 

A lemur

Researchers Design Facial Recognition System as a Less Invasive Approach to Tracking Lemurs in the Wild

February 17, 2017

A team of researchers led by Rachel Jacobs, a biological anthropologist at GW’s Center for the Advanced Study of Human Paleobiology, has developed a computer-assisted recognition system that can identify individual lemurs in the wild by their facial characteristics. The facial recognition method has the potential to redefine how researchers track species while aiding in conservation efforts for the world’s most endangered mammals.

Human Brain and Tooth

New study finds evolution of brain and tooth size were not linked in humans

January 02, 2017

A new study co-authored by Aida Gómez-Robles, Postdoctoral Scientist and Bernard Wood, Professor of Human Origins at the University's Center for the Advanced Study of Human Paleobiology (CASHP) found that whereas brain size evolved at different rates for different species, especially during the evolution of Homo, the genus that includes humans, chewing teeth tended to evolve at more similar rates.

Limusaurus Inextricabilis

No Teeth? No Problem. Dinosaur Species Had Teeth as Babies, Lost Them as They Grew

December 22, 2016

A study co-authored by James Clark, the Ronald Weintraub Professor of Biology, has discovered that a species of dinosaur, Limusaurus inextricabilis, lost its teeth in adolescence and did not grow another set as adults. The finding, published today in Current Biology, is a radical change in anatomy during a lifespan and may help to explain why birds have beaks but no teeth.