Three Minute Thesis (3MT)

A 100-page dissertation could take hours to present. Can you do it in 3 minutes? 

The Three Minute Thesis (3MT®) Competition celebrates the existing research conducted by PhD students. Developed by The University of Queensland (UQ), 3MT cultivates students’ academic, presentation, and research communication skills. The competition supports their capacity to effectively explain their research in three minutes, in a language appropriate to a non-specialist audience.


History

The first 3MT competition was held at UQ in 2008 with 160 Higher Degree by Research (HDR) candidates competing. In 2009 and 2010, the 3MT competition was promoted to other Australian and New Zealand universities and enthusiasm for the concept grew. Due to its adoption in numerous universities, a multinational event was developed, and the Inaugural Trans-Tasman 3MT competition was held at UQ in 2010.

Since 2011, the popularity of the competition has increased and 3MT competitions are now held in over 600 universities across more than 65 countries worldwide.

The first GW 3MT competition was in 2019 and was only available to CCAS PhD students.  We are excited to expand this competition to SEAS as well as CCAS PhD students in 2022!

3MT at GW

The 2022 3MT competition was a joint effort of GW's Columbian College of Arts and Sciences and the School of  Engineering and Applied Science. The event was held in person on Thursday, February 24, and live-streamed on Facebook. Audience members voted Ferhan Guloglu, (Anthropology, CCAS) the winner of the People's Choice award. A faculty judging panel selected Anthony Hennig (Systems Engineering, SEAS) the third-place finisher, Ruoyu Chen (Economics, CCAS) placed second, and Dustin Abele (Chemistry, CCAS) was selected as the competition's overall winner. GW's 3MT winner or a runner-up will go on to compete in the Northeastern Association of Graduate School's regional competition on April 28.

Eligibility

We are excited to collaborate with the School of Engineering and Applied Sciences (SEAS) this year so we can expand the 3MT competition to include CCAS and SEAS Ph.D. students. To be eligible, students must have successfully advanced to candidacy no later than 1 February 2022.  Students must also be in good academic standing.

Why Participate?

During your PhD there is a strong focus on the production of your dissertation. The ability to communicate the importance of your research project and articulate your findings is very valuable. The Three Minute Thesis competition provides you with the opportunity to:

  • Communicate your ideas effectively to the wider community;
  • Describe your research findings to a non-specialist audience;
  • Crystalise your thoughts about your dissertation;
  • Increase your profile within the CCAS research community, staff and wider community; and
  • Network with other PhD students.

3MT Prizes

First Place = $1000
Second Place = $750
Third Place = $500
People's Choice = $500

How to Prepare

Check out the official Three Minute Thesis (3MT®) Vimeo channel to view past presentations from around the globe.

Rules

  • A single static PowerPoint slide is permitted. No slide transitions, animations or ‘movement’ of any description are allowed. The slide is to be presented from the beginning of the oration.
  • No additional electronic media (e.g. sound and video files) are permitted.
  • No additional props (e.g. costumes, musical instruments, laboratory equipment) are permitted.
  • Presentations are limited to 3 minutes maximum and competitors exceeding 3 minutes are disqualified.
  • Presentations are to be spoken word (e.g. no poems, raps or songs).
  • Presentations are to commence from the stage.
  • Presentations are considered to have commenced when a presenter starts their presentation through either movement or speech.
  • The decision of the adjudicating panel is final.

 


Judging Criteria

At every level of the competition, each competitor will be assessed on the judging criteria listed below. Each criterion is equally weighted and has an emphasis on audience.

Comprehension and Content

  • Did the presentation provide an understanding of the background and significance to the research question being addressed while explaining terminology and avoiding jargon?
  • Did the presentation clearly describe the impact and/or results of the research, including conclusions and outcomes?
  • Did the presentation follow a clear and logical sequence?
  • Was the thesis topic, research significance, results/impact and outcomes communicated in language appropriate to a non-specialist audience?
  • Did the presenter spend adequate time on each element of their presentation — or did they elaborate for too long on one aspect or was the presentation rushed?

Engagement and Communication

  • Did the oration make the audience want to know more?
  • Was the presenter careful not to trivialize or generalize their research?
  • Did the presenter convey enthusiasm for their research?
  • Did the presenter capture and maintain their audience’s attention?
  • Did the speaker have sufficient stage presence, eye contact, and vocal range; maintain a steady pace, and have a confident stance?
  • Did the PowerPoint slide enhance the presentation — was it clear, legible, and concise?

 


Previous Winners

2022 3MT Winners

First Place

Dustin Abele

Chemistry

Sustainable Materials for High Energy Density Lithium-ion Batters

Second Place

Ruoyu Chen

Economics

Evaluating the Effects of Carbon Trading on Power Sector Emissions in China: A View From Space

Third Place

Anthony Hennig

Systems Engineering

The Complexities of Measuring Complexity

People's Choice

Ferhan Güloglu

Anthropology

Natural Mothers in the Making

 

 

2021 Virtual 3MT Winners

On Thursday, February 24, nine Ph.D. students from across CCAS doctoral programs in the humanities, sciences and social sciences faced off in friendly competition in the third annual CCAS Three Minute Thesis (3MT®) Dissertation Competition. The competition challenges students to effectively communicate their research to a non-specialist audience in three minutes. 

In this year’s virtual competition students submitted pre-recorded videos of their 3MT presentations and the winners were announced at Thursday’s live event. The 1st, 2nd and 3rd place winners were selected by a judging panel of CCAS faculty members; Professor Heidi Bardot, (Art Therapy) Professor Shelley Brundage, (Speech and Hearing Sciences) Professor Harald Grassheimmer (Physics) and CCAS Dean, Paul Wahlbeck (Political Science). A People’s Choice winner was selected by the audience. 

In total, student’s 3MT videos garnered almost 500 views within one week with the People’s Choice winner receiving over 170 individual views. It was a job well done by all of the doctoral students taking part in this year’s virtual Three Minute Thesis competition! 

First Place

Katherine Hinnant

Chemistry

Can You Fight Fires with Shampoos?

 

Second Place

Turni Chakrabarti

English

Disruptive Widowhood in the Bengali and British Novel

Third Place

Stephanie Gomez

Microbiology & Immunology

How Can the Immune System Be Activated to Treat Ovarian Cancer?

People's Choice

Djordje Modrakovic

Clinical Psychology

Better Safe Sex: HIV Preventative Interventions & Psychosexual Health Among Men Who Have Sex with Men

 

2020 3MT Winners

First Place

Kimberly Foecke

Human Paleobiology

Nitrogen, Neanderthals, and Seeing Diet in the Past.

Second Place

Abhilasha Sahay

Economics

The Silenced Women: Can Public Activism Stimulate Disclosure of Violence Against Women.

Third Place & People's Choice

Michelle Kramer

Cognitive Neuroscience

Context Matters: How Previous Events Influence Airport Baggage Screening Success.

 

2019 3MT Winners

First Place

Elizabeth Pertner

Political Science

Watching the Watchdog

Second Place

Matthew Lefler

Chemistry

Making Carbon Nanotubes from Thin Air

Third Place

Chelsea Ullman

Public Policy and Administration

How Can Policy be Used to Get Justice for Campus Sexual Assault Survivors?

People's Choice

Jiaqi J. O'Reilly

Biomedical Sciences: Neuroscience

The Placenta: The Most Important Organ That Everyone Loses