Faculty Books

From the history of race and caste in Latin America to the role of music in religion around the world, Columbian College faculty publish numerous thought-provoking and timely titles every year. Their work has topped bestseller lists, inspired debate and dialogue and received positive reviews from high-profile outlets like the Los Angeles Review of Books and The New York Times.

Naming the Dawn by Adbourahman Waberi

Naming the Dawn

May 15, 2018

Abdourahman A. Waberi, assistant professor of French and Francophone literature, authored a new volume of poetry which is introspective and inquisitive, reflecting a deep spiritual bond—with words, with the history of Islam and its great poets, with the landscapes those poets walked, among which Waberi grew up.

Electoral Rules and Democracy in Latin America

Electoral Rules and Democracy in Latin America

April 26, 2018

Cynthia McClintock, professor of political science and international affairs, provides a rigorous assessment of the implications of runoff rules in presidential elections throughout many Latin America nations. She compares them to plurality rules and demonstrates that, in contrast to early scholarly skepticism about runoffs, they have been positive for democracy in the region.

Enemies and Friends of the State: Ancient Prophecy in Context

Enemies and Friends of the State: Ancient Prophecy in Context

April 13, 2018

Christopher A. Rollston, associate professor of Northwest Semitic languages and literatures, edited this volume that plumbs the depths of the prophetic voices of the Hebrew Bible, the Old Testament Apocrypha, and the Greek New Testament. More than 25 of the most distinguished scholars in the field of biblical studies contributed articles.

Linguistic and Material Intimacies of Cell Phones

Linguistic and Material Intimacies of Cell Phones

April 13, 2018

Joel Kuipers, professor of anthropology and international affairs, co-authored this detailed ethnographic and anthropological examination of the social, cultural, linguistic and material aspects of cell phones. The book links the use of cell phones to contemporary discussions about representation, mediation and subjectivity and investigates how this increasingly ubiquitous technology challenges the boundaries of privacy and selfhood and raises new questions about how we communicate.

America's Middlemen: Power at the Edge of Empire

America's Middlemen: Power at the Edge of Empire

March 15, 2018

Eric Grynaviski, associate professor of political science and international affairs, examines how and why the U.S. government has formed alliances with militias, tribes and rebels. Sometimes, these alliances have been successful. But they have also risked creating larger wars in regions where the United States has no real interest. By developing broader views about political agency—how people come to make a difference in world politics—he brings into focus new histories of world politics.

International Students in First-Year Writing: A Journey Through Socio-Academic Space

International Students in First-Year Writing: A Journey Through Socio-Academic Space

March 06, 2018

Megan Siczek, director and assistant professor of the English for Academic Purposes, explores the journey of 10 international students to better understand their experiences at a U.S. educational institution and how they constructed and revealed these experiences in this particular socio-academic space. The book gives voice to students outside the dominant cultural and linguistic community.

Mediating Islam: Cosmopolitan Journalisms in Muslim Southeast Asia by Janet Steele

Mediating Islam: Cosmopolitan Journalisms in Muslim Southeast Asia

March 01, 2018

Janet Steele, associate professor of media and public affairs and international affairs, examines day-to-day reporting practices of Muslim professionals, from conservative scripturalists to pluralist cosmopolitans, at five exemplary news organizations in Malaysia and Indonesia. Broadening an overly narrow definition of Islamic journalism, she explores how these publications observe universal principles of journalism through an Islamic idiom.

God’s Country: Christian Zionism in America

God’s Country: Christian Zionism in America

February 20, 2018

Samuel Goldman is an assistant professor of political science, combines original research with insights from the work of historians of American religion to craft a provocative narrative that chronicles Americans' attachment to the State of Israel. He looks at the controversial special relationship between the two nations through the  story of Christian Zionism in American political and religious thought from the Puritans to 9/11.

Before Mestizaje: The Frontiers of Race and Caste in Colonial Mexico

Before Mestizaje: The Frontiers of Race and Caste in Colonial Mexico

December 07, 2017

Columbian College Dean Ben Vinson, III opens new dimensions on the history of race and caste in Latin America in this examination of the extreme caste groups of Mexico. Focusing on lobos, moriscos and coyotes, he details the experiences of different races and castes while tracing the implications of their lives in the colonial world—exposing the connection between mestizaje (Latin America's modern ideology of racial mixture) and the colonial caste system.

Joel Blecher Said the Prophet of God cover

Said the Prophet of God: Hadith Commentary across a Millennium

November 07, 2017

Joel Blecher, assistant professor of history, breaks open a brand new field in Islamic studies: how hadith (Muhammad’s sayings and practices) were debated and understood over the past millennium. It offers a window into how communities from classical Muslim Spain to Medieval Egypt to modern India interpreted and re-interpreted the hadith in different ways for their own context, weaving together tales of high court rivalries, public furors and colonial politics.

Crip Times by Robert McRuer

Crip Times: Disability, Globalization, and Resistance

November 07, 2017

Professor of English Robert McRuer asks how disability activists, artists and social movements generate change and resist the dominant forms of globalization in an age of austerity, or “crip times.” Broadly attentive to the political and economic shifts of the last several decades, he considers how transnational queer disability theory and culture—activism, blogs, art, photography, literature and performance—provide important and generative sites for both contesting austerity politics and imagining alternatives.

Money for Votes: The Causes and Consequences of Electoral Clientelism in Africa

Money for Votes: The Causes and Consequences of Electoral Clientelism in Africa

November 02, 2017

Eric Kramon, assistant professor of political science and international affairs, looks at examples of politicians distributing money to voters during campaigns in low-income democracies and develops an alternative theory of electoral clientelism beyond “vote buying.” Instead, he emphasizes the role of monetary handouts in conveying information to voters, helping politicians enhance the credibility of their promises to deliver development resources and particularistic benefits to their constituents.

The Fight for Fair Housing Causes, Consequences and Future Implications of the 1968 Federal Fair Housing Act

The Fight for Fair Housing Causes, Consequences and Future Implications of the 1968 Federal Fair Housing Act

October 20, 2017

Gregory D. Squires, professor of sociology and public policy and public administration, edited this collection that explores the impact of the Federal Fair Housing Act of 1968. The book brings together the nation’s leading fair housing activists and scholars to tell the stories that led to the passage of the act; its dual mandate to end discrimination and dismantle the segregated living patterns; its consequences; and its implications.

Some Say the Lark by Jennifer Chang

Some Say the Lark

October 10, 2017

Jennifer Chang, assistant professor of English, presents a collection of poems that narrate grief and loss, and intertwines them with hope for a fresh start in the midst of new beginnings. With topics such as frustration with our social and natural world, her poems openly question the self and place and how private experiences like motherhood and sorrow necessitate a deeper engagement with public life and history.

We Wear the Mask: 15 Stories of Passing in America by Lisa Page

We Wear the Mask: 15 Stories of Passing in America

October 10, 2017

Lisa Page, assistant professor of English and director of creative writing, coedited with former GW Writer-in-Residence Brando Skyhorse, a timely anthology that examines the complex reality of passing in America. Page shares how her white mother didn’t tell friends about her black ex-husband or that her children were, in fact, biracial.

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