Faculty-led Short-Term Abroad Programs

December 6, 2022

Short-Term Abroad Programs present a fantastic way to enhance the academic experience for both students and faculty.  While traveling abroad together, groups can find new layers of knowledge and culture that they can then bring back and share with the GW community.

Some topics may seem like a natural fit for a study abroad course, such as studying Shakespeare in London or examining the history of WWII in Germany. Past GW Short-Term Abroad Programs have included Art Therapy in India, Music in Brazil, Education Policy in Turkey, Urban Sustainability in Panama, Health Management in Israel, and many more programs around the world. 

Whether you are a faculty member hoping to create an STAP course, or a student eager to apply for one, CCAS global is here to support you. Please direct any questions and concerns to [email protected].


Summer 2023

The execution of all STAP programs are contingent upon global health and safety conditions. All info sessions are in Eastern Standard Time.

  • Application deadline is 11:59PM (ET), February 24, 2023
  • Commitment and deposit deadline is 11:59PM (ET), March 8, 2023

All Info Sessions Sign-Up

  

Paris, France

France: Global Cities (SOC 2181-10)

Dates Abroad: June 4 - June 18, 2023

Location(s): Paris, France

Info Session(s):

February 7, 12pm, PHIL 410 & Zoom
February 15, 3pm, PHIL 410

Course Description:

Globalization has linked together some of the largest cities of the world financially, economically, geopolitically, and culturally. Climate change, diseases, war, migration and trade connect the fates of residents in far-flung locations.  Air transportation, the internet, media, sports and film make it possible to live as citizens of the world.  And as more people leave the land for city life, more of the human population is urbanizing, overwhelming infrastructure and available housing. Despite common pressures, however, cities retain their distinctiveness and unique networks.  Citizens and strangers celebrate joyous events in open public spaces. Capital cities like Washington and Paris have dense diplomatic relations, but also their own symbols, landmarks, architecture, spatial forms, social compositions, values and ways of life. This course examines the similarities and differences of these and other global cities, including those in the Global South that aspire to world status. It should appeal to city lovers everywhere.

Apply Now

  

Namibia: Namibian San, the last hunter-gatherers, a sociological journey (SOC 2181-11)

Dates Abroad: July 8 - 29, 2023

Location(s): Tusmkwe, Namibia

Info Session(s):

February 8, 12pm, PHIL 410

February 14, 3pm, PHIL 410

Course Description:

This short-term abroad course offers the extraordinary opportunity to spend time with the last hunter-gatherers of the planet, the Ju’/hoansi San of Namibia, in the Nyae Nyae Conservancy, the only place where they are allowed to leave traditionally. 

During our three weeks in Tsumkwe, the capital of the San community of Namibia, we will learn about San history, their struggles and their attempts to find some space within the Namibian national identity. We will look at different sociological aspects of the community: gender relations, social stratification, education, identity (de/re)constructions and power relations within the community and in relation to the Namibian national identity. Students will have the privilege to interact with members of the community, and when not in the classroom, they will follow the Ju’/hoansi’s steps on bush walks, where they will learn about their skills as trackers and their knowledge about indigenous plants. 

This class will offer a unique immersion opportunity for students.

Apply Now

 

A hillside in Greece full of white homes

Greece: The Art of Living (PHIL 2111/HONR 2053)

Dates Abroad: May 24 - June 4, 2023

Location(s): Athens, Santorini, and Crete, Greece

Info Session(s):

February 17, 4pm, Rome 569

Course Description:

This short-term abroad course offers the extraordinary opportunity to study ancient Greek philosophy in Athens and the Peloponnese, and on the island of Santorini. We will visit the Oracle at Delphi that pronounced Socrates the wisest human being, and we will have class near the jail cell where the Athenians forced Socrates to drink hemlock. We will walk through the ruins of Aristotle's Lyceum, and we will visit the stunning site of Akrotiri on the island of Santorini that may have inspired Plato’s Myth of Atlantis. Before coming home, we will set sail from the Piraeus to get a sense of the place where the Athenians defeated the Persians and fought the twenty-seven year Peloponnesian War with the Spartans. This exciting program will introduce you to ancient Greek philosophy and take you to some of the places where the history of philosophy began!

Apply Now

 

Amsterdam windmill

Netherlands: Understanding Organisms through Service (BISC 1008-10)

Dates Abroad: July 23 - August 13, 2023

Location(s): Amsterdam, the Netherlands

Info Session(s):

February 7, 5pm, BELL 204

February 15, 6pm, DUQUES 151

Course Description:

In Understanding Organisms through Service, we will explore the basics of ecological systems, challenges, and solutions. You will compare and contrast the American mindsets to those of the Dutch ideals. We will find that people have quite different views, but we will dive into what leads to this variation and how change occurs in these two different cultures. We will also discuss many other ecological challenges including agriculture, water, fossil fuel use and the energy crisis. These topics are plastered across media sources, but we will see how Americans talk about and try to solve these issues versus the Dutch. These topics are not just scientific in their nature instead they include aspects of politics, business, and very personal and religious issues. Together we will tackle these topics and connect them to our community through the service you will perform to apply this information.

This course is paired with Culture of Sustainability in the Netherlands, 15th – 21st C. (UW 2020W/HIST 3101W) to complete two pillars of the Sustainability minor. Both courses lodge and travel together in the Netherlands, and you pay only one set of program/lodging/travel/cultural fees if you take both courses. 

Apply Now

 

Amsterdam bikes

Netherlands: Culture of Sustainability in the Netherlands, 15th – 21st C. (UW 2020W/HIST 3101W)

Dates Abroad: July 23 - August 13, 2023

Location(s): Amsterdam, the Netherlands

Info Session(s):

 

February 7, 5pm, BELL 204

February 15, 6pm, DUQUES 151

Course Description:

Amsterdam is unique in that every square centimeter has been painstakingly designed: dredged from the sea, drained, and canalized since the 15th century, raising key questions of sustainability. These processes shape the city’s relationship not only to water, but also to surrounding villages, farms, and natural spaces, most of them sitting on equally human-made land. The term landscape derives from the Dutch "landschop", literally shoveled land. How have Dutch architects, planners, designers, and politicians shoveled this land? How do they respond to 21st century demands of climate change? We will also approach Dutch visual culture through a lens of sustainability.

Amsterdam’s rich heritage of art was built on liberal immigration policy but also on slavery and colonization. How can this complex legacy be understood, preserved, critiqued, and built upon? Amsterdam’s museums and galleries work to answer these questions and, more concretely, help shape the physical geography of the city itself.

We’ll address these networked issues of sustainability with a multi-disciplinary approach, hosting virtual field trips and live chats with Dutch experts and special guests.

This course is paired with Understanding Organisms through Service (BISC 1008-10) to complete two pillars of the Sustainability minor. Both courses lodge and travel together in the Netherlands, and you pay only one set of program/lodging/travel/cultural fees if you take both courses. 

Apply Now

 

London Modern Architecture

London: Modern + Contemporary Architecture (CIAR 4560-10/CIAR 6560-10)

Dates Abroad: July 18 - August 2, 2023

Location(s): London, United Kingdom

Info Session(s):

February 9, 7pm, Webex

Course Description:

Spend two weeks in London this summer taking one or both courses offered by the Corcoran Interior Architecture Program! This is an opportunity to learn about and visit
interiors and buildings using London as our classroom.

This course will introduce students to the history of modern and contemporary architecture through the context of key buildings of the 20th/21stCentury, using the architecture of London to emphasize key concepts. Students will learn the leaders in architectural history, as well as innovative contemporary designers working today. Through lectures, readings, and discussions, an overview of the architecture, interiors, and furniture of the most significant and unique buildings in history will be explored and examined. By merging conceptual thinking, design thinking, and critical thinking in combination with history, this course will incorporate a complete exploration of modern and contemporary architecture.

Corcoran School of Interior Architecture (CIAR)  offers another STAP course in Summer 2023 named Sustainability + The Built Environment. The abroad portion of that course will also take place in London during the same abroad dates. Students are welcome to learn more about Sustainability + The Built Environment and take both courses. 

Apply Now

 

London Sustainability Architecture

London: Sustainability + the Built Environment (CIAR 4560-11/CIAR 6560-11)

Dates Abroad: July 18 - August 2, 2023

Location(s): London, United Kingdom

Info Session(s):

February 9, 7pm, Webex

Course Description:

Spend two weeks in London this summer taking one or both courses offered by the Corcoran Interior Architecture Program! This is an opportunity to learn about and visit interiors and buildings using London as our classroom.

The environmental issues that we are facing appear to be overwhelming. How can we hope to accomplish anything? You might be pleasantly surprised to know that your influence as an interior designer is and can be far-reaching. The average American spends nearly 93% of their life indoors, according to the Environmental Protection Agency. As noted by the United States Green Building Council, “buildings are one of the heaviest consumers of natural resources and account for a significant portion of the greenhouse gas emissions that affect climate change...buildings represent 73% of US electricity consumption.” After completing this course, you will appreciate the myriad and complex variables that we designers can influence regarding the well-being of people and the planet.

Corcoran School of Interior Architecture (CIAR)  offers another STAP course in Summer 2023 named Modern + Contemporary Architecture. The abroad portion of that course will also take place in London during the same abroad dates. Students are welcome to learn more about Modern + Contemporary Architecture and take both courses. 

Apply Now

 

Chennai India

India: International Art Therapy: Cultural Awareness, Unconscious Bias & Reciprocal Learning (ARTH 6265)

Dates Abroad: July 7 - July 28, 2023

Location(s): Chennai, India

Info Session(s):

January 23, 5pm, Zoom

Course Description:

Join us in this exciting opportunity to study and explore social and cultural diversity, awareness, art, and art therapy in a culture different than your own. Participants will be in India for three weeks. This trip includes coursework and community service or reciprocal-learning, art and cultural experientials, discussion groups, and artmaking and journaling. Community work will include an elementary school for disadvantaged children, physical and mental health facilities, a children’s cancer center, and men and women’s shelters.

Students will explore their own racial and cultural self-awareness and unconscious biases through self-assessment, develop strategies for working with diverse communities, hone critical thinking skills, learn from local leaders, and create art therapy specific to the cultural setting and influences. A foundation of knowledge will be offered to understand the diversity of artistic language, symbolism, and art-making process across cultures.

To see previous summer abroad experiences, visit our Facebook page and the GW Art Therapy website.

Watch Info Session Recording

Apply Now

 

Two field workers in Koobi Fora, Kenya

Kenya: Koobi Fora Field School (ANTH 3832/ANTH 6832)

Dates Abroad: June 9 – July 23, 2023

Location(s): Koobi Fora and Nairobi, Kenya

Course Description:

The Koobi Fora Field School (KFFS) is open to undergraduate and graduate students who wish to learn the basic principles and field methods of paleoanthropology on location. Students receive hands-on introductory training in all of the major disciplines within paleoanthropology: paleontology, archaeology, geology, taphonomy and ecology. 

The Koobi Fora area is protected within the Sibiloi National Park in Kenya and is listed as a World Heritage Site by UNESCO. Its rich Pliocene, Pleistocene and Holocene sedimentary deposits have yielded a treasure trove of fossils and archaeological materials.

The execution of this program is contingent upon global health and safety conditions.

*This course is restricted. If interested, please contact Prof. David Braun at [email protected] before applying.

Apply Now

 


Spring 2023

 

A stone building lit up at night

Latin American Perspectives on Intersectionality and Cross-Culturalism (PSYC3199, WGSS3170)

Dates Abroad: March 9 - March 18, 2023

Location(s): Mexico City and Puerto Vallarta in Mexico

Info Session (EST): 9/20/22, 5pm & 9/22/22, 12pm, at Phillips 411 & Zoom

Course Description:

This course with Prof. Stephen Forssell takes an intersectional approach to examining sexual orientation and sexual identity with special attention paid to the Latinx experience of same-sex sexuality. We will explore social science research related to gay, lesbian, bisexual, transgender, and Queer (LGBTQ) identities, as well as non-LGBTQ identified same-sex sexuality in both the U.S. and in Latin America. Informed by the cultural context of two cities central to gay life in Mexico, and enhanced through academic readings, cultural excursions and community engagement, this course will explore unique challenges and triumphs of individual and groups navigating the diverse and multiple LGBTQ identities and lifestyles that co-exist within contemporary Mexican urban society. Students will explore topics such as LGBTQ identity development, race/ethnicity, LGBTQ transnational interface (specifically, the co-mingling of Mexican and American LGBT Communities), as well as a community’s response to the HIV-AIDS and Covid-19 pandemics.

Our backdrops for exploration will be Mexico City (CDMX) and Puerto Vallarta, Mexico. CDMX is home to one of most vibrant and active gay and lesbian cultures in Latin America. La Zona Rosa is the center of queer life in CDMX, home to many nightclubs, shops, and restaurants that cater to and support the LGBTQ community. Puerto Vallarta has developed into Mexico’s premiere gay resort town, a satellite gay space for its big sister cities of Mexico City and Guadalajara, much as Fire Island is to New York City.

Watch Info Session Recording

Application Closed

  

Guadalajara, Mexico

Philosophy of the Environment (PHIL 2281, GEOG 3195, IAFF 2190)

Dates Abroad: March 10 - March 19, 2023

Location(s): Guadalajara, Mexico

Info Session (EST): 9/22/22, 12pm, ROME 569 & 9/27/22, 5pm, PHIL B156

Course Description:

This Short-Term Abroad Program, led by Prof. Michele Friend, on philosophy of the environment is organized in close collaboration with the University of Guadalajara. We shall be learning about Chapala Lake and the river basin of the Santiago river. We shall be listening to lectures about the ecology and geography of the region. We shall be talking with local politicians, academics, industrialists, people involved in NGOs, local farmers, indigenous peoples and students from the University of Guadalajara. We shall be traveling together in a bus.

We shall have the privilege to witness first-hand the landscape, the extent of the pollution in the area, how this is affecting the economy and the health of ecosystems and humans, and conversely, how our human activity and economic decisions affects the ecology. 

Watch Info Session Recording

Application Closed

  

Students in Paris

International Media Seminar in Paris (SMPA 3195)

Dates Abroad: March 12 - March 18, 2023

Location(s): Paris, France

Info Session (EST):

9/28, 6:30pm, SMPA 511 & 10/4, 6:30pm, SMPA 511

Course Description:

This Short-Term Abroad Program led by Prof. Lee Huebner combines the excitement of spending spring break in Paris with a unique learning experience, focused on the changing nature of communications media in a new global environment.

During the course of the spring break, students will meet with some two dozen international media leaders — journalists, executives, scholars, and government officials. Meetings are held in classrooms, media offices, production facilities and private homes — offering a once in a lifetime behind-the-scenes experience. Free time is also scheduled into the program so that students have the chance to see the sites and enjoy the city.

Over the past fourteen years, students at the George Washington University have been able to participate in the Paris Seminar as part of a regular three-credit course SMPA 3195, "Globalization and the Media", open to all GW undergraduate and graduate students. The program is taught and chaired by Professor Lee Huebner. Student participants have found the Paris Media seminar to be a highlight of their university careers — introducing them to new places, new perspectives and new personalities. As one recent participant put it, "the Paris trip was life-changing… the trip of a lifetime."

Both the course and the Paris Seminar are designed to give undergraduate and graduate students an opportunity to study the global media landscape from a truly international perspective — not only in theory, but in fact. By talking with a wide array of experts who live and work in a foreign media environment, students are able to see familiar media issues in a new light — even as they become more familiar with other media cultures.

Info Session RSVP

Application Closed

 

Students visiting memorial in Germany

Disability and the Holocaust (ENGL 3912)

Dates Abroad: March 11 - March 18, 2023

Location(s): Berlin, Germany

Info Session (EST): 9/21/22, 12pm, Phillips 629 & Zoom

Course Description:

This Short-Term Abroad Program led by Prof. David Mitchell focuses on the history of Nazi Germany's impact on disabled people. The 1980s, nearly four decades after the formal end of World War II, a group of German and American historians began connecting the genocide of 6 million Jewish (as well as Romany, Russian, and gay) people in the Holocaust to the mass killings of 300,000 disabled people in psychiatric hospitals, clinics, and institutions.  The “euthanasia murders” began in October 1939 nearly a year and a half before the advent of the “final solution” in Nazi death camps.  The research caused a great deal of debate amongst Holocaust scholars due to the fact that medical killings were treated separately from those prosecuted for Nazi war crimes during the Nuremburg trials.  Many believe that physician supervised killings in medical institutions counted as treatment for those classified as “lives unworthy of life” (i.e. those diagnosed with physical, cognitive, and sensory disorders and, in the terms of the time, incapable of productive labor).  This past September, following decades of disability activism, the first state supported memorial to those killed in the T4 program opened in Berlin.  The class will grapple with questions of the relationship of medical murders to Holocaust genocide, the struggle to publicly memorialize the T4 killings in Germany, as well as consider how this history affects the lives of German disabled people today. 

Watch Info Session Recording

Application Closed

 

GW students in front of a white cross in Normandy

The Price of Freedom: Normandy 1944 (History 3044W)

(Subject to change)

Dates Abroad: March 9 - March 20, 2023

Location(s): Normandy, France and Other

Info Session (EST): 9/28, 12:30pm & 6:30pm, PHIL 411

Course Description:

“The Price of Freedom: Normandy 1944” (History 3044W) is an experiential course which explores the causes, conduct, and consequences of modern war through the vehicle of the 1944 Normandy Campaign, examining its impact on individuals, communities, and the nation.

Through an extensive series of lectures, discussions, and films we explore the massive, complex, and uncertain D-Day invasion and the fighting through the liberation of Paris. The class starts with a rigorous “staff ride” (that’s army-speak for a participatory, educational tour) of the entire campaign. Each student will conduct a briefing about some element of the campaign at the appropriate location. The highlight of the trip will be a visit to the actual landing beaches and the laying of a wreath at the memorial in the American Cemetery at Omaha Beach, followed by each student presenting a eulogy for his or her soldier at the soldier’s graveside.

Watch Info Session Recording

Application Closed

 

 

Fall 2022
GW students in Prague

Transnational Queer Film (ENGL 3980-60H)

Dates Abroad: November 4 - November 13, 2022

Location(s): Prague, Czech Republic

Application Deadline: August 12, 2022

Deposit Deadline: August 26, 2022

Course Description:

This course (English 3980-60H, CRN 78561) with Prof. Robert McRuer, Transnational Queer Film Studies and LGBTQ Cultures, is in the interdisciplinary field that has come to be called “queer” studies over the past two decades and it has always concerned itself with questions of representation: how are, for instance, lesbians, gay men, bisexuals, or transgendered people, represented in film, in novels, in other forms of media? As the field has developed, these questions of representation have increasingly been linked to other, complex questions, involving political economy, globalization, and transnationalism: in what ways have LGBT people been incorporated into contemporary nation-states? What identities and desires threaten “the nation” as it is currently (and variously) materialized in our world? How have identities such as “gay” and “lesbian” circulated globally? How have those recognizable minority identities come into contact and conflict with other ways of identifying around non-normative desires? Have those identities at times functioned imperialistically, especially as “gay tourism” has become a recognizable part of global capitalism? Conversely, what kinds of unexpected alliances have been shaped across borders as queer movements have globalized? How have these movements theorized race, gender, class, and ability; what connections have been made with other movements organized, however contentiously, around identity?

This film studies course will consider how questions of queer representation intersect with questions of queer globalization(s). From November 4-13, we will travel to Prague, Czech Republic to attend Mezipatra: Queer Film Festival along with students from Charles University in Prague in Professor Katerina Kolárová’s class.

The execution of this program is contingent upon global health and safety conditions.

Learn More

Summer 2022
A hillside in Greece full of white homes

The Art of Living: Ancient Greece and the Origins of Western Thought (PHIL2111/HONR 2053)

Dates Abroad: May 17 - May 28, 2022

Location(s): Athens, Chania, Heraklion, and Santorini in Greece

Application Deadline: March 1, 2022

Deposit Deadline: March 8, 2022

Course Description:

This short-term abroad course with Prof. Mark Ralkowski offers the extraordinary opportunity to study ancient Greek philosophy in Athens and the Peloponnese, and on the island of Santorini. We will visit the Oracle at Delphi that pronounced Socrates the wisest human being, and we will have class near the jail cell where the Athenians forced Socrates to drink hemlock. We will walk through the ruins of Aristotle's Lyceum, and we will visit the stunning site of Akrotiri on the island of Santorini that may have inspired Plato’s Myth of Atlantis. Before coming home, we will set sail from the Piraeus to get a sense of the place where the Athenians defeated the Persians and fought the twenty-seven year Peloponnesian War with the Spartans. This exciting program will introduce you to ancient Greek philosophy and take you to some of the places where the history of philosophy began!

We will begin with the fragmentary writings of the Presocratic philosophers, which date back to the 6th century BCE. And we will finish with the essays of Seneca and the Meditations of Marcus Aurelius. Along the way, we will spend most of our time studying the thought of Socrates, Plato, and Aristotle. Our discussions will cover issues in ethics, politics, psychology, aesthetics, religion, metaphysics, and epistemology. One of the primary goals of this seminar is to see that, in the ancient world, these concepts were often treated together and studied as a way of life whose goals were wisdom and happiness. As Socrates once said, “We are studying no small matter, but how we ought to live.”

The execution of this program is contingent upon global health and safety conditions.

Learn More

  

Houses by the sea in Lisbon

Lisbon: Hospitality Design for the People (CIAR 6300)

Dates Abroad: June 26 - July 10, 2022

Location(s): Lisbon, Portugal

Application Deadline: March 1, 2022

Deposit Deadline: March 8, 2022

Course Description:

This course with Prof. Nadia V. Volchansky is focused on hospitality design industry, specifically in Lisbon. It will offer students an exciting, in-depth study of a global site (in Lisbon), its user group, and overall experience, resulting in a boutique hotel design project. The hybrid (on-campus and abroad) model, in which this course will be structured, is novel for a course of its type, but is essential in connecting off-site to on-site research, and reinforcing design decisions. In this course, students will lead a thorough pre-design research of a global site, hospitality issues, and trends, and use it to design a boutique hotel project to reflect their study on campus. Students will then travel to Lisbon to experience hospitality industry in Lisbon, explore the relevance of their research, and work closely with European designers and architects to finalize their design project. Semester will culminate with a design critique and student reflection on the relevance of user research and significance of site in their design projects.

The execution of this program is contingent upon global health and safety conditions.

Learn More

 

Two field workers in Koobi Fora, Kenya

Koobi Fora Field School in Kenya

Dates Abroad: June 10–July 31, 2022

Location(s): Koobi Fora and Nairobi in Kenya

Application Deadline: March 1, 2022

Deposit Deadline: March 8, 2022

Course Description:

The Koobi Fora Field School (KFFS) is open to undergraduate and graduate students who wish to learn the basic principles and field methods of paleoanthropology on location. Students receive hands-on introductory training in all of the major disciplines within paleoanthropology: paleontology, archaeology, geology, taphonomy and ecology. 

The Koobi Fora area is protected within the Sibiloi National Park in Kenya and is listed as a World Heritage Site by UNESCO. Its rich Pliocene, Pleistocene and Holocene sedimentary deposits have yielded a treasure trove of fossils and archaeological materials.

The execution of this program is contingent upon global health and safety conditions.

*This course is restricted. If interested, please contact Prof. David Braun at [email protected] before applying.

Learn More

Spring 2022

  

GW students in front of a white cross in Normandy

The Price of Freedom: Normandy 1944 (History 3044W)

“The Price of Freedom: Normandy 1944” (History 3044W) is an experiential course which explores the causes, conduct, and consequences of modern war through the vehicle of the 1944 Normandy Campaign, examining its impact on individuals, communities, and the nation.

Through an extensive series of lectures, discussions, and films we explore the massive, complex, and uncertain D-Day invasion and the fighting through the liberation of Paris. The course will carry 4 credits, satisfy a WiD requirement, and meet GPAC elements for Global Perspective, Oral Communication, and Critical Thinking. The course will be limited to 17 students. It will meet for lectures on Tuesday and Thursday from 4:45 to 6:00 pm, discussion on Thursday from 6:00 to 7:00 pm, and on Thursday, after discussion, for watching films from 7:00 until 9:30 pm or so. Each student writes four papers, including a biography of a soldier from his or her hometown who died in the Normandy Campaign and who is buried in the Normandy American Cemetery.

Then, Pandemic permitting, on Friday night, March 11, 2022, the class will fly to London to begin a rigorous “staff ride” (that’s army-speak for a participatory, educational tour) of the entire campaign – all the way from the planning in England to the beaches and on to Paris. Each student will conduct a briefing about some element of the campaign at the appropriate location. The highlight of the trip will be a visit to the actual landing beaches and the laying of a wreath at the memorial in the American Cemetery at Omaha Beach, followed by each student presenting a eulogy for his or her soldier at the soldier’s graveside. We’ll return Tuesday, 23 March.

To apply for the course, please submit a written application to Professor Long by 5pm on Friday, October 15, 2021. You can obtain the Application in the History Department Office (Phillips 335), or from Professor Long (Phillips 300). Professor Long will interview each applicant and the successful applicants will submit an application, through GW Passport, to the CCAS Office of Global Initiatives.

It is anticipated that the additional expense associated with the travel element of the course will be about $4,700 for items like airfare, hotels, some meals, bus transport, etc. In addition, you should plan on taking about $350 - $400 to cover the cost of 4 lunches, 5 dinners (plus any spending money). You will be required to make a $500 deposit when you are accepted for the course. One half of the balance will be due on January 10, 2022, and the balance on February 10. A limited amount of scholarship money is likely to be available for students who require assistance to be able to participate. Please try to evaluate your circumstances carefully.

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