Press Announcements

a starry dwarf frog, or Astrobatrachus kurichiyana

New Frog Species Discovered in Southern India Biodiversity Hotspot

March 12, 2019
S.P. Vijayakumar, a postdoctoral scientist in biology, led a team of researchers on an expedition to  isolated hills in Southern India where they discovered a new, ancient lineage of frogs. With a group of scientists that included R. Alexander Pyron, the Robert F. Griggs Associate Professor of Biology, Vijayakumar located the new species—Astrobatrachus kurichiyana, or the “Starry Dwarf Frog”—on a forest floor within the remote Western Ghats mountain range. The discovery could solve evolutionary questions in one of the world’s major biodiversity hotspots.
Chryssak Cocoon, an explosion of gamma ray burst thought to be the most powerful explosions in the cosmos

Detailed Early Observations of a Nearby Supernova and Associated Jet Cocoon Provide New Insights about Gamma-ray Bursts

January 17, 2019

Professor of Astrophysics Chryssa Kouveliotou and an international team of researchers provided new insights into Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), the most powerful explosions in the cosmos, and their relations to supernova. GRB explosions are so massive that they should always produce visible supernovae. But some supernova do not have associated GRBs. The global research group observed a hot cocoon around the jets of matter that serves as the missing link connecting supernovae and GRBs.

Artist’s reconstruction of important alvarezsaur species from left to right, Haplocheirus, Xiyunykus, Bannykus, and Shuvuuia.

Rare Fossils Reveal Bird-Like Dinosaur Clues

August 23, 2018

James Clark, the Ronald Weintraub Professor of Biology, led an international team of researchers who discovered a new bird-like species of dinosaur called Xiyunykus pengi during an expedition to Xinjiang, China. The discovery fills in a missing evolutionary link for an enigmatic group of dinosaurs that share many characteristics with birds, including bird-like skulls and many small teeth instead of the large, sharp teeth seen in other dinosaurs.

political cartoons by Rob Rogers depicting starbucks and nfl sensitivity trainings

‘Spiked’ Political Cartoons Find Public Display at Corcoran

July 17, 2018

A collection of censored political cartoons by fired Pittsburgh Post-Gazette artist Rob Rogers were first seen by a public audience at a nationally recognized  Corcoran School of the Arts and Design exhibition titled “Spiked: The Unpublished Political Cartoons of Rob Rogers.” The gallery features 10 unpublished Rogers cartoons and eight sketches.

Steinkamp Loop at the Corcoran

Corcoran Acquires Historic Art Trove

May 14, 2018

The Corcoran School of the Arts and Design acquired hundreds of sculptures, paintings and photographs from the Corcoran Gallery of Art’s permanent collection, laying the foundation for an estimable research collection that will be accessible to Corcoran students as well as faculty, staff and the public. The 18 paintings, 642 photographs, 93 prints and 15 sculptures gifted to the Corcoran School include works by Ansel Adams, Eugene Delacroix, Sally Mann, Mary Ellen Mark and William Wegman.

Microscopic view of carbon nanotubes created from carbon dioxide using the C2CNT process

Greenhouse Gas Reduction Project Advances to Research Competition Finals

April 09, 2018

Professor of Chemistry Stuart Licht and his team of researchers are finalists in the $20 million NRG COSIA Carbon XPRIZE competition for their C2CNT project, a low-energy, low-cost method of transforming carbon dioxide into harmless and widely-used carbon nanotubes. The greenhouse gas reduction technology developed in Licht’s lab may potentially impact climate change.

Alison Brooks and Rick Potts

Researchers Discover Evidence of Technology and Behaviors Linked to Emergence of Human Species

March 15, 2018

Professor of Anthropology Alison Brooks led a team of international collaborators, including scientists from the Smithsonian’s National Museum of Natural History, that discovered evidence of early humans in East Africa using coloring materials and obtaining a range of raw materials from distant sources— activities which imply the existence of social networks—about 320,000 years ago, much earlier than previously thought.

Modern humans (left) have brains that are more than three times larger than our closest living relatives, chimpanzees (right)

Brain size of human ancestors evolved gradually over 3 million years

February 22, 2018

A study by Bernard Wood, professor of human origins at the GW Center for the Advanced Study of Human Paleobiology, and a team of Columbian College alumni showed that the average brain size of human ancestors increased gradually over 3 million years, growing to more than three times larger than our closest living relatives.

This artist’s impression shows two tiny but very dense neutron stars at the point at which they merge and explode as a kilonova.

Astrophysicists Identify 'Monumental' Kilonova Blast

October 16, 2017

Four Columbian College astrophysicists are part of a global group of scientists who collaborated to identify and study the first confirmed observation of two merging neutron stars, a so-called kilonova. The existence of a kilonova—an explosive event roughly 1,000 times brighter than a nova—had long been suggested but was never definitively witnessed until now.

Dr. Arnaud Martin have found a "painting gene" that influences the pattern and evolution of butterfly wings

Scientists Find ‘Painting Gene’ Influences Pattern, Evolution of Butterfly Wings

September 18, 2017

An international team of scientists including Arnaud Martin, assistant professor of biology, made a breakthrough in understanding how genetics and evolution work in concert to shape biodiversity by investigating the complex color patterns of butterfly wings. Martin used CRISPR gene-editing technology to study the role of the WntA gene in the formation of shapes and colors on butterfly wings—and how they diversify.

An excerpt from a leaf of the newly discovered manuscript of “Fath al-bari” at the Suleymaniye Library in Istanbul.

Early Drafts of a Classic Work of Islamic Thought Discovered

June 08, 2017

GW Assistant Professor of History Joel Blecher recently discovered the new manuscripts of two previously unknown versions of “Fath al-Bari,” a classic work that shaped the way Sunni Muslims understand Muhammad’s sayings and practices. Dr. Blecher visited the Suleymaniye Library in Istanbul in 2014 to examine a database of digitized manuscripts that can only be accessed in person, with the goal of learning more about how medieval Muslims interpreted Muhammad’s sayings and practices, called hadith. The manuscripts reveal how medieval Islamic scholars drafted and revised their understanding of Muhammad’s teachings to the early Muslim community.

Soyeon Park, GWTeach student who taught fourth graders at Maury Elementary in D.C. (Photo: Meghan Hollibaugh Baker)

GW Establishes New Program to Bring More STEM Teachers to High-Need Schools

May 15, 2017

Research Professor of Physics Larry Medsker announced a new STEM initiative called GWNoyce. Named after the Robert Noyce Teacher Scholarship Program, this initiative offers science, technology, engineering and mathematics majors the opportunity to receive teacher training and scholarships for agreeing to teach in high-need school districts across the country after graduating from GW.

Lisa Bowleg

New Tool for Measuring Police and Law Enforcement Interactions Reflects Police-Based Discrimination Experiences of Black Men

May 03, 2017

Researchers led by Lisa Bowleg, Professor of Applied Social Psychology at the George Washington University, have developed a new tool to catalog police and law enforcement interactions with black men, the Police and Law Enforcement (PLE) Scale, with the hope of documenting people’s experiences and perceptions of police-based discrimination. The study found that police-based discrimination is associated with depression symptoms such as sadness, hopelessness and loss of interest and ambition. Because of this, the authors believe that police-based discrimination should be considered a public health threat.

two bonobos

Study Finds Bonobos May Be Better Representation of the Last Common Ancestor with Humans than Common Chimpanzees

April 28, 2017

A new study by Bernard Wood, Professor of Human Origins at the GW Center for the Advanced Study of Human Paleobiology, has provided firsthand evidence that bonobos may be more closely linked, anatomically, to human ancestors than common chimpanzees. Previous research suggested this theory at the molecular level, but this is the first study to compare in detail the anatomy of the three species.

Dr. Calabrese presenting PrEP research

Study Finds Medical Providers Who Prescribe PrEP to Prevent HIV Don’t See Most Patients Increasing Risky Sexual Behavior

April 26, 2017

A new study led by Assistant Professor of Clinical Psychology Sarah Calabrese found that medical providers who prescribe PrEP, which stands for pre-exposure prophylaxis and is essential to to curbing the number of new HIV diagnoses, do not see widespread increases in risky sexual behavior among their patients as a result. As such, providers do not consider such behavior change to be a reason to discontinue or limit PrEP.

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