Faculty Books

From the history of race and caste in Latin America to the role of music in religion around the world, Columbian College faculty publish numerous thought-provoking and timely titles every year. Their work has topped bestseller lists, inspired debate and dialogue and received positive reviews from high-profile outlets like the Los Angeles Review of Books and The New York Times.

The First Modern Jew

The First Modern Jew

February 26, 2012

The First Modern Jew, by Assistant Professor of History Daniel B. Schwartz, provides a riveting look at how Jewish philosopher Baruch Spinoza (1632-1677) went from being one of Judaism's most notorious outcasts to one of its most celebrated, if still highly controversial, cultural icons, and a powerful and protean symbol of the first modern secular Jew.

Prove It On Me

Prove It On Me

February 24, 2012

In Prove It On Me, Assistant Professor of History Erin D. Chapman explores the gender and sexual politics of this modern racial ethos and reveals the constraining and exploitative underside of the New Negro era's vaunted liberation and opportunities. Chapman's cultural history documents the effects on black women of the intersection of primitivism, New Negro patriarchal aspirations, and the early twentieth-century consumer culture.

Marvellous Repossessions

Marvellous Repossessions: The Tempest, Globalization and the Waking Dream of Paradise

February 15, 2012

Professor of English Gil Harris explores The Tempest and its historical background, based on the Garnett Sedgewick Lecture at the University of British Columbia he delivered in 2011. In his examination of contemporary anti-colonialist productions of The Tempest, Harris shows how there remains a move backwards to an original paradise—in fact replicating the movement within The Tempest itself.

Ramesses III: The Life and Times of Egypt's Last Hero

Ramesses III: The Life and Times of Egypt's Last Hero

February 15, 2012

In Ramesses III: The Life and Times of Egypt's Last Hero, Chair of  the Department of Classical & Near Eastern Languages & Civilizations Eric Cline reflects on the flourishing reign of the former King of Egypt, Ramesses III. Cline examines the life, work, and world of one of Egypt's most influential rulers, focusing both on his regime and its lasting impact on the study of the political and cultural history of ancient Egypt.

Women's History for Beginners

Women's History for Beginners

February 14, 2012

Women's History for Beginners, co-authored by Adjunct Professor of Women's Studies Bonnie Morris, explores the role of women in the progression of world history and culture. Morris challenges the reader to consider the importance of women's history, as it is often omitted from or glossed over by history textbooks.

Urban and Regional Policy and its Effects

Urban and Regional Policy and its Effects

February 02, 2012

Harold Wolman

Essentials of Health, Culture, and Diversity

Essentials of Health, Culture, and Diversity

January 25, 2012

In Essentials of Health, Culture, and Diversity (Essential Public Health), Associate Professor of Prevention and Community Health and International Affairs Mark Edberg examine the relationship between culture and health issues. Through research and theoretical methods, Edberg demonstrates how public health efforts can benefit from understanding and collaborating with cultural methods.

Comparative Anatomy and Phylogeny of Primate Muscles and Human Evolution

Comparative Anatomy and Phylogeny of Primate Muscles and Human Evolution

January 11, 2012

In Comparative Anatomy and Phylogeny of Primate Muscles and Human Evolution, Professor of Human Origins and Human Evolution Anatomy Bernard Wood argues that human and social evolution should play a major role in systematics. He provides a comprehensive summary and analysis of the comparative anatomy and evolution of the head, neck, pectoral and upper limb muscles of primates.

The Company We Keep: Occupational Community in the High-Tech Network Society

The Company We Keep: Occupational Community in the High-Tech Network Society

January 06, 2012

Professorial Lecturer in Sociology Daniel Marschall provides an absorbing ethnography that sheds light on the nature of the computer technology industry marked by highly skilled jobs and rapid technological change. He chronicles employee experiences, examining how they characterize their occupational culture, share values and work practices, and help one another within their community.

Sex and Disability

Sex and Disability

January 04, 2012

Sex and Disability, edited by the Chair of the Dept of English Robert McRuer, considers the ways in which sex and disability overlap, and how disabled people negotiate sexuality in the world today. In a collection of essays, contributors challenge cultural conceptions of disability, along with queer and disability studies.

Foundations for the Future

Foundations for the Future: The Fundraising Role of Foundation Boards at Public Colleges and Universities

January 01, 2012

Professor of Nonprofit Management Michael Worth draws on the findings of a recent Association of Governing Boards survey of public college and university affiliated foundation board members and executives to provide a thorough summary of the role of fundraising in college and university foundation boards and discusses ways they contribute to successful development programs.

Oxford Handbook of the Bronze Age Aegean

Oxford Handbook of the Bronze Age Aegean

January 01, 2012

Associate Professor Eric H. Cline, Chair of the Department of Classical and Near Eastern Languages and Civilizations authored the new definitive volume Oxford Handbook of the Bronze Age Aegean. This book provides a detailed survey of the Bronze Age and the civilizations that flourished during that period.

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