Faculty Books

From the history of race and caste in Latin America to the role of music in religion around the world, Columbian College faculty publish numerous thought-provoking and timely titles every year. Their work has topped bestseller lists, inspired debate and dialogue and received positive reviews from high-profile outlets like the Los Angeles Review of Books and The New York Times.

Cities of North America: Contemporary Challenges in U.S. and Canadian Cities

Cities of North America: Contemporary Challenges in U.S. and Canadian Cities

December 12, 2013

Lisa Benton-Short, associate professor of geography, edits this book which explores the evolving issues that metropolitan areas throughout the United States and Canada are facing such as economic development, finance, social cohesion, and justice.

Every Rock a Universe: The Yellow Mountains and Chinese Travel Writing

Every Rock a Universe: The Yellow Mountains and Chinese Travel Writing

November 16, 2013

Jonathan Chaves, Professor of Chinese, presents the first complete Western language translation of Qing dynasty poet Wang Hongdu's writings about the Yellow Mountains. He explores the history of scholarly and religious pilgrimage to the mountains in China's Anhui province before presenting a complete English translation, with extensive annotations, of Wang's newly rediscovered travel writings.

Megiddo V—The 2004-2008 Seasons

Megiddo V—The 2004-2008 Seasons

November 01, 2013

Eric Cline, Chair of the Department of Classical & Near Eastern Language & Civilizations and Professor of Classics and Anthropology, is co-editor of the three-volume final report, Megiddo V—The 2004-2008 Seasons. In the set, finds of the 2004-2008 seasons from the Megiddo Expedition are recorded from a wide range of topics including the Late Bronze II–III, Iron I, and Iron IIA pottery of Megiddo, and a final account of the Early Bronze Age cultic compound.

Eros and Sexuality in Islamic Art

Eros and Sexuality in Islamic Art

October 23, 2013

Mika Natif, Assistant Professor of Art History, co-edited Eros and Sexuality in Islamic Art. This volume fills a gap in the field of Islamic art history by shedding light on the topics of eroticism and sexuality in the visual production of the medieval and early modern Muslim world. Preexisting ideas about erotic motifs in Islamic visual arts are challenged by rigorous contextual and cultural analyses provided in the book.

From Foreclosure to Fair Lending: Advocacy, Organizing, Occupy, and the Pursuit of Equitable Credit

From Foreclosure to Fair Lending: Advocacy, Organizing, Occupy, and the Pursuit of Equitable Credit

October 22, 2013

Professor of Sociology and Public Policy and Public Administration Gregory Squires co-edited this book, which addresses new opportunities and the challenges that remain in fair housing and fair lending through the accounts of activists, organizers, and scholars. These experts also look forward to determine the best direction for future action in the advocacy and achievement of justice in housing in lending.

Jan van Eyck and Portugal's "Illustrious Generation": Volume I

Jan van Eyck and Portugal's "Illustrious Generation": Volume I

October 22, 2013

Professor of Art History Barbara von Barghahn explores Jan van Eyck's patronage by the Crown of Portugal and his role as a diplomat-painter for the Duchy of Burgundy following his first voyage to Lisbon in 1428-1429. Von Barghahn provides analysis of new portrait identifications with regard to King Joao I's conquest of Ceuta, achieved by his sons who were hailed as an "illustrious generation." A second "secret mission" to Portugal in 1437 by Jan van Eyck is also explored by von Barghahn.

Essentials of World Regional Geography

Essentials of World Regional Geography

October 04, 2013

Joseph Dymond, assistant professor of geography, and Elizabeth Chacko, associate professor of geography and international affairs, contribute to this work which explores cultural, environmental, political, and economic issues in regards to the global community.

Photo of book cover Resistance to Learning

Resistance to Learning

September 19, 2013

Marshall Alcorn, professor of English, examines qualities of student resistance to new and uncomfortable information and proposes methods for teachers and professors to work productively with such resistance. Research in neuroscience, education, sociology, political science, and the humanities has contributed to a revisionary understanding of how emotion grounds human reason, interaction, and communication.

The Gamble

The Gamble

September 15, 2013

Professor of Political Science John Sides and University of California, Los Angeles Professor Lynn Vavreck combine quantitative data with social science and campaign reporting to provide a unique and precise picture of the 2012 presidential election. Sides and Vavreck argue that the billion-dollar campaigns by Mitt Romney and Barack Obama largely cancel each other out allowing outside influences like economic growth to decide the election.

The American Revolution Reader

The American Revolution Reader

August 07, 2013

Assistant Professor of History Denver Brunsman and Professor of History David Silverman co-edited The American Revolution Reader. The book contains a collection of essays on the American Revolution through the presidency of George Washington. The articles explore topics ranging from life in the colonies to political and ideological reasoning for the revolution, and the roles of women, African Americans and Native Americans during the period.

Trading Tongues: Merchants, Multilingualism, and Medieval Literature

Trading Tongues: Merchants, Multilingualism, and Medieval Literature

July 28, 2013

Professor of English Jonathan Hsy offers a fresh approach to the multilingualism of early English authors like Geoffrey Chaucer, and others like French lyricist Charles d’Orléans. Hsy illustrates how languages commingled in late medieval and early modern cities by juxtaposing literary works with Latin and French civic records, mixed-language merchant miscellanies, and bilingual phrasebooks.

Attachment in Group Psychotherapy

Attachment in Group Psychotherapy

June 30, 2013

Cheri Marmarosh, Professor of Clinical Psychology, co-authored Attachment in Group Psychotherapy. The book applies attachment theory to group psychotherapy by explaining how group therapists can effectively work with members of different attachment styles. The book provides clinical guidance and case examples for numerous aspects of group therapy to help readers understand the needs of each group member and help move them toward positive change.

Religion, Politics, and Polarization: How Religiopolitical Conflict Is Changing Congress and American Democracy

Religion, Politics, and Polarization: How Religiopolitical Conflict Is Changing Congress and American Democracy

June 20, 2013

Professor of Sociology and of Public Policy and Public Administration Steven Tuch, William D'Antonio, and Josiah R. Baker trace the confluence of religion and party in the U.S. Congress over time. Drawing on forty years of congressional roll call votes and public opinion survey data, they argue that Democratic and Republican ideologies are both grounded in religious values and beliefs that party member voting patterns.

Bas Jan Ader: Death is Elsewhere

Bas Jan Ader: Death is Elsewhere

May 27, 2013

Alexander Dumbadze, Professor of Art History, authored Bas Jan Ader: Death is Elsewhere on the art and life of the enigmatic contemporary artist. Dumbadze looks closely at Ader's engagement with questions of free will and his ultimate success in creating art untainted by mediation in the first in-depth study of this artist who has gained legendary status with the literal will to die for his art.

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