Faculty Books

From the history of race and caste in Latin America to the role of music in religion around the world, Columbian College faculty publish numerous thought-provoking and timely titles every year. Their work has topped bestseller lists, inspired debate and dialogue and received positive reviews from high-profile outlets like the Los Angeles Review of Books and The New York Times.

Cover of "Earth (Object Lessons)" by Jeffrey Jerome Cohen and Linda T. Elkins-Tanton

Earth (Object Lessons)

March 09, 2017

Professor of English Jeffrey Jerome Cohen teams with planetary scientist Linda T. Elkins-Tanton to explore what happens when we think of the Earth as an object viewable from space. Viewing the Earth from space invites a dive into the abyss of scale: how can humans apprehend the distances, the temperatures, and the time scale on which planets are born, evolve, and die?

Three Stones Make a Wall: The Story of Archaeology by Eric Cline

Three Stones Make a Wall: The Story of Archaeology

March 07, 2017

Eric Cline, professor of classics, anthropology and history, traces the history of archaeology from an amateur pursuit to the cutting-edge science it is today by taking the reader on a tour of major archaeological sites and discoveries, from Pompeii to Petra, Troy to the Terracotta Warriors, and Mycenae to Megiddo and Masada.

Harvest of Skulls by Abdourahman A. Waberi

Harvest of Skulls

February 20, 2017

Professor of French Language and Literature Abdourahman A. Waberi wrote about the Rwandan Genocide twenty years after the event, providing an indisputable resource for discussions on testimony and witnessing, the complex relationship between victims and perpetrators, the power of the moral imagination, and how survivors can rebuild a society haunted by the ghost of its history.

Leading Change: George Washington and Establishing the Presidency

Leading Change: George Washington and Establishing the Presidency

February 01, 2017

Denver Brunsman, associate professor of history, details the creation of the executive office by our country’s most influential political leader, George Washington. His unanimous election as the first president ignited a series of changes to the new republican system of government—changes that still affect the American political system more than 200 years later. The book discusses how today’s leaders can follow his example.

Ask More: The Power of Questions to Open Doors, Uncover Solutions, and Spark Change

Ask More: The Power of Questions to Open Doors, Uncover Solutions and Spark Change

January 10, 2017

Frank Sesno, professor of media and public affairs and international affairs, reveals the secrets to asking the right questions at the right time—the hidden skill that links successful people in all walks of life. He shows how questions help us break down barriers, discover secrets, solve puzzles and imagine new ways of doing things while conveying interest, feeding curiosity and revealing answers that can change professional and personal lives.

The Mathematics of Politics, Second Edition 2nd Edition

The Mathematics of Politics, Second Edition 2nd Edition

November 16, 2016

E. Arthur Robinson, professor of mathematics, and Daniel H. Ullman, professor of mathematics counter the impression that mathematics is only the study of numbers and has no relevance to politics. They examine the Electoral College system and address political questions such as: Is there a good way to choose winners of elections? Is there a good way to apportion congressional seats? Is there a good way to make decisions in situations of conflict and uncertainty?

City of Dreams: The 400-Year Epic History of Immigrant New York

City of Dreams: The 400-Year Epic History of Immigrant New York

October 18, 2016

Tyler Anbinder, professor of history, chronicles the American immigrant story by focusing on New York City as the nation’s defining port of entry for nearly four centuries and a magnet for transplants from all over the globe. He profiles migrants who brought their hundreds of languages and distinct cultures to the city—and from there to the entire country.

Interactive Journalism: Hackers, Data and Code

Interactive Journalism: Hackers, Data and Code

October 15, 2016

Nikki Usher, assistant professor of media and public affairs, presents comprehensive portrait of how interactive journalism has transformed the newsroom by using a visual presentation of storytelling that allows users to interact with the reporting of information. She provides a history of the impact of digital technology on reporting, photojournalism, graphics and other disciplines that define interactive journalism.

Thundersticks: Firearms and the Violent Transformation of Native America

Thundersticks: Firearms and the Violent Transformation of Native America

October 10, 2016

David J. Silverman, professor of history, examines the adoption of firearms by American Indians between the 17th and 19th centuries as a turning point in the history of North America’s indigenous peoples and a cultural earthquake so profound that its impact has yet to be adequately measured. He maintains that firearms empowered American Indians to pursue their interests and defend their political and economic autonomy over two centuries.

17th-Century Chinese Paintings from the Tsao Family Collection

17th-Century Chinese Paintings from the Tsao Family Collection

August 29, 2016

Jonathan Chaves, professor of Chinese, contributed to this rare collection of Chinese paintings from the 17th century, providing translations of the poetic inscriptions on the works of art and authoring a chapter on literary gatherings in China and their cultural significance.

Spillover Effects of China Going Global

Spillover Effects of China Going Global

August 18, 2016

Joseph Pelzman, professor of economics, examines the massive transformation the Chinese economy has made within just a few decades of being granted Most Favored Nation status by the United States. He shows how the second largest world economy triggered off many spillover effects beyond mass-labor production of durable and non-durable goods.

Media Movements: Civil Society and Media Policy Reform in Latin America

Media Movements: Civil Society and Media Policy Reform in Latin America

August 15, 2016

Silvio Waisbord, professor of media and public affairs, co-authored this examination of how 21st century movements throughout contemporary Latin America—using marches, occupation of space, social media organization and more—have given voice to marginalized citizens whose lives have been upset by the falsity of a globalized economy.

Presidential Libraries as Performance book cover

Presidential Libraries as Performance

August 11, 2016

Jodi Kanter, associate professor of theatre, presents the first critical assessment of all 13 extant presidential libraries. Through exhaustive research, she reveals how presidential libraries generate narratives about individual presidents, historical events and who we are as Americans.

The National Mall: No Ordinary Public Space

The National Mall: No Ordinary Public Space

July 20, 2016

Lisa Benton-Short, associate professor of geography, explores the critical issues redefining and reshaping the National Mall in Washington, D.C., one of the most important and highly visible urban public spaces in the United States and considered by many Americans to be “the nation’s front yard.”

Foreign Policy: Thinking Outside the Box

Foreign Policy: Thinking Outside the Box

June 29, 2016

Amitai Etzioni, university professor of sociology, authored this collection of essays that reconsider basic assumptions of international foreign policy, focusing on the Middle East, China, the EU and other global perspectives.

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