Published Books

Columbian College faculty are filling the bookshelves with prolific scholarly publications on an array of fascinating topics. The following is a sampling of our faculty’s recently published books.



17th-Century Chinese Paintings from the Tsao Family Collection

17th-Century Chinese Paintings from the Tsao Family Collection

August 29, 2016

Jonathan Chaves, professor of Chinese, contributed to this rare collection of Chinese paintings from the 17th century, providing translations of the poetic inscriptions on the works of art and authoring a chapter on literary gatherings in China and their cultural significance.

Media Movements: Civil Society and Media Policy Reform in Latin America

Media Movements: Civil Society and Media Policy Reform in Latin America

August 15, 2016

Silvio Waisbord, professor of media and public affairs, co-authored this examination of how 21st century movements throughout contemporary Latin America—using marches, occupation of space, social media organization and more—have given voice to marginalized citizens whose lives have been upset by the falsity of a globalized economy.

Presidential Libraries as Performance book cover

Presidential Libraries as Performance

August 11, 2016

Jodi Kanter, associate professor of theatre, presents the first critical assessment of all 13 extant presidential libraries. Through exhaustive research, she reveals how presidential libraries generate narratives about individual presidents, historical events and who we are as Americans.

The National Mall: No Ordinary Public Space

The National Mall: No Ordinary Public Space

July 20, 2016

Lisa Benton-Short, associate professor of geography, explores the critical issues redefining and reshaping the National Mall in Washington, D.C., one of the most important and highly visible urban public spaces in the United States and considered by many Americans to be “the nation’s front yard.”

The Dictator's Dilemma: The Chinese Communist Party's Strategy for Survival

The Dictator's Dilemma: The Chinese Communist Party's Strategy for Survival

June 15, 2016

Bruce J. Dickson, professor of political science and international affairs, provides a comprehensive explanation for the Chinese Communist Party’s continued survival and prosperity. He refutes the commonly held narrative that the Communist Party is facing imminent collapse and that democracy is inevitable in China.

National Geographic The Greeks: An Illustrated History

National Geographic The Greeks: An Illustrated History

June 07, 2016

Diane Harris Cline, associate professor of history, authored this lavishly illustrated reference guide on the culture that brought us democracy, the Olympics, Socrates and Alexander the Great. She presents ancient Greece through gripping stories, from the rise and fall of the empire to the powerful legacy it left for the modern world.

In Their Own Words: Slave Life and the Power of Spirituals

In Their Own Words: Slave Life and the Power of Spirituals

June 01, 2016

Eileen Guenther, lecturer in the Department of Music, presents a groundbreaking study of slavery and spirituals, placing the unique voices of an enslaved people squarely within the context of their daily lives.

Women on the Run: Gender, Media, and Political Campaigns in a Polarized Era

Women on the Run: Gender, Media, and Political Campaigns in a Polarized Era

May 03, 2016

Danny Hayes, associate professor of political science, co-authored this book which offers a unified argument for understanding the role that gender plays in contemporary congressional elections.

The New Arab Wars: Uprisings and Anarchy in the Middle East

The New Arab Wars: Uprisings and Anarchy in the Middle East

April 26, 2016

Marc Lynch, professor of political science and international affairs, illuminates how the hope-filled Arab uprisings morphed into a dystopia of resurgent dictators, failed states and civil wars.

The Oxford Handbook of Music and World Christianities

The Oxford Handbook of Music and World Christianities

April 13, 2016

Jonathan Dueck, assistant professor of writing, co-edited this volume of essays from leading ethnomusicological scholars investigating music's role in everyday practice and social history across the diversity of Christian religions and practices around the globe.

The Star and the Stripes: A History of the Foreign Policies of American Jews

The Star and the Stripes: A History of the Foreign Policies of American Jews

March 15, 2016

Michael N. Barnett, professor of international affairs and political science, examines how American Jews envision their role in the world. As Jews, he argues, they are committed to their people's survival. As Americans, they identify with, and believe their survival depends on, the American principles of liberalism, religious freedom and pluralism.

China's Future

China's Future

March 14, 2016

David Shambaugh, professor of political science and international affairs, examines whether China will implement a new wave of transformational reforms that could make it the world's leading superpower, or whether its leaders will shy away from drastic changes. He argues China’s future path depends on key decisions yet to be made by its leaders, pressures from within Chinese society and actions by other nations.

Decolonization: A Very Short Introduction

Decolonization: A Very Short Introduction

March 02, 2016

Dane Kennedy, the Elmer Louis Kayser Professor of History and International Affairs, explores the historical process of “Decolonization”—the transition from a world of colonial empires to a world of nation-states in the years after World War II. He highlights the era’s widespread violence and refugee crises, which lead to political problems that persist today.

Logic and Algebraic Structures in Quantum Computing (Cambridge University Press)

Logic and Algebraic Structures in Quantum Computing

March 01, 2016

Ali Eskandarian, professor of physics, and Valentina Harizanov, professor of mathematics, edited a collection of international cross-disciplinary research on physics and quantum logic.

Accidental Activists: Victim Movements and Government Accountability in Japan and South Korea

Accidental Activists: Victim Movements and Government Accountability in Japan and South Korea

March 01, 2016

Celeste L. Arrington, Korea Foundation Assistant Professor of Political Science and International Affairs, examines the politics of redress to understand why victims of government wrongdoing are not equally effective at obtaining redress. She compares the Japanese and South Korean movements of victims of harsh leprosy control policies, blood products tainted by hepatitis C and North Korean abductions.